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Conspiracy theory about ‘new world order’ won’t save Vancouver home from foreclosure, judge rules

When Karen Wai King Lew told a B.C. judge that her mortgage debt had been completely forgiven, she invoked a two-decade-old conspiracy theory about a “new world order” that has recently resurfaced.

According to a recent B.C. Supreme Court ruling, Lew appealed a foreclosure order on her Vancouver home on the basis that something called NESARA/GESARA had been enacted and all credit card, mortgage and other bank debt would be wiped out in a “jubilee” of forgiveness.

“She described it as a pending new world order that has its roots in the United States (NESARA), but has evolved to a global movement (GESARA), to which many countries are signatories, including Canada,” Justice Sharon Matthews wrote in her July 12 decision.

“She asserted that it involves resignation of world leaders, new currencies that will be backed by gold, and a more harmonious and peaceful world where the enslavement qualities of debt will be abolished.”

Believers in this theory claim that NESARA, the National Economic Security and Reformation Act, was secretly passed by U.S. Congress in 2000 and set to be announced on Sept. 11, 2001. The theory is that all evidence was destroyed when a shadowy cabal of world leaders arranged for the attack on the World Trade Center in New York.

GESARA, the Global Economic Security and Reformation Act, is supposedly the worldwide version of the law.

Of course, none of that is true, and Lew’s arguments had no effect in court.

“I have not accepted that NESARA/GESARA is part of the Canadian legal landscape. I do not accept that Ms. Lew has proven there is a new world order pending that will end foreclosure proceedings,” Matthews wrote.

The judge upheld an order granting conduct of sale of Lew’s home to the Bank of Montreal, and ordered her to pay costs to the bank, as well as a second mortgage-holder.

‘Illuminati’ blamed for supposed cover-up

Phoney legal theories based on fanciful interpretations of the law have seen a resurgence since the COVID-19 pandemic began, but this appears to be the first B.C. court decision in a NESARA/GESARA argument that has been posted publicly.

NESARA was a real proposal for a bill, created by an American man named Harvey F. Barnard, who laid out his ideas in a 1996 book entitled Draining the Swamp: Monetary and Fiscal Policy Reform.

People like Lew claim that NESARA has been law for more than 20 years, followed by international implementation of GESARA.

According to the website gesara.news, which Lew relied upon to make her arguments in court, former U.S. president Bill Clinton signed NESARA into law at gunpoint, but he supposedly knew “full well that the Illuminati were in charge, and that this law was never to be enforced.”

It goes on to say that Sept. 11 attacks destroyed all the computers and data related to trillions of dollars in “Properity Funds” that were supposed to be returned to debtors across the country. Since then, the theory goes, all public officials, police, judges, journalists and anyone else who knows about NESARA have been subject to a gag order preventing them from exposing the existence of this supposed new order.

It’s not mentioned in the court ruling, but the self-proclaimed “Queen of Canada,” a B.C.-based QAnon conspiracy influencer named Romana Didulo​​, has announced on Telegram that she is rolling out NESARA/GESARA in Canada.

A Google Streetview image shows a two-storey beige house with green-tinted glass in the windows and dead leaves on the neatly mowed front lawn.
The Bank of Montreal has been granted conduct of sale on Karen Lew’s $1.7-million property at 2716 Waverley Ave., Vancouver. (Google Maps)

Lew, who represented herself in court, claimed that the balance on her mortgage was zero as of Feb. 8 because of NESARA/GESARA, the ruling says. But she didn’t present any evidence of that in court, or that NESARA or GESARA had actually been implemented in Canada or B.C.

According to B.C. Assessment, Lew’s home at 2716 Waverley Ave. was valued at $1.7 million in 2022. She purchased it for just $401,000 in 1998.

An order of foreclosure for the property was granted by B.C. Supreme Court Master Kimberley Robertson this spring, after the deadline to redeem the $209,721.51 bank mortgage debt had passed, according to the ruling.

Apart from arguing that her mortgage debts had been forgiven, Lew also claimed in her appeal that Robertson was biased when she ordered the foreclosure.

“She submitted that Master Robertson became a master because she knew that her law firm’s foreclosure practice would be ending when all mortgages and other debts were forgiven,” the ruling says.

Matthews found there was “no merit” to that claim.

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